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Recent News in Medical Marijuana Laws

The legalization of marijuana and medical marijuana laws is a divisive subject that plays along political, spiritual and cultural lines. Here is some of the recent news involving medical marijuana:

  • “Pot Like Wine” – Attitudes towards legalizing pot in the United States are changing. As of April 2012, 12 states have pending bills to legalize the use of medical marijuana and five more are pushing legislation for the regulated use of recreational marijuana: California, Colorado, Missouri, Oregon, and Washington. These bills, such as California’s “Regulate Marijuana Like Wine” and Colorado’s “Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol” would make marijuana a taxable item sold to those 21 years of age and older, with a penalty for selling pot to minors. Missouri’s bill even proposes the legalization of growing plots up to 10 feet by 10 feet in size.
  • Demographic Support – The majority of the bills are expected to pass, with the California, Colorado, and Oregon bills receiving overwhelming support. The fate of the Washington initiative is less certain, a between more conservative Spokane and pot-friendly Seattle. Overall, men, young adults and liberals are more in favor of legalizing pot than conservatives, senior citizens and women. Some of the biggest detractors of the legalization initiatives, however, are medical marijuana dispensaries. The dispensaries are afraid of losing business if marijuana can be legally obtained elsewhere.
  • Those in Favor – The legalization of marijuana would be a boon to those looking to earn social work degrees, as well as those who are denied medical marijuana cards. Legislation would legalize medical marijuana for people under 21 who would benefit from it usage. A recent Angus Reid poll shows that the majority of Americans are in agreement that legalizing pot would do more good than harm. In the poll, 55 percent favor legalization, while only 40 percent are against.
  • Legislation Process – The key to legalizing pot is mobilization and support. California’s petition gathered 10,000 signatures in just two weeks. Pro-pot America is actively trying to pass pro-pot legislation. For those interested in learning more about the legislative process or even obtaining an online JD degree, educating yourself about the system is a powerful way to help end prohibition.

Sources

Denver Westword Blogs (2012)

StoptheDrugWar.org (2011)

42 state lawmakers ask DEA to reclassify marijuana

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) – More than three dozen Washington state lawmakers sent a letter to the federal government on Monday, asking for marijuana to be reclassified as a drug that can be prescribed by doctors and filled by pharmacists.

Reclassifying marijuana as a Schedule II drug would allow it to be prescribed by doctors and handled by pharmacists. Marijuana is currently classified a Schedule 1 drug, meaning it’s not accepted for medical treatment and can’t be prescribed, administered or dispensed.

In the letter to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, the lawmakers said they supported Gov. Chris Gregoire’s previous request on the issue. Seven Republican lawmakers were among the 42 in both the House and the Senate who signed the letter.

In addition to the letter, Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles, D-Seattle, introduced Senate Joint Memorial 8017 making the same request to reclassify medical marijuana. The joint memorial was scheduled for a hearing in the Health & Long Term Care Committee on Thursday.

Gregoire and Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee filed the petition with the DEA last November. Washington and Rhode Island are two of 16 states and the District of Columbia that have laws allowing the medical use of marijuana.

Washington voters approved a medical marijuana law in 1998 that gives doctors the right to recommend – but not prescribe – marijuana for people suffering from cancer and other conditions that cause “intractable pain.”

Last year, Gregoire vetoed most of a bill that made major reforms to the state’s medical marijuana law, saying state workers could be prosecuted under federal law the way the measure was written.

A separate bill this year is attempting to provide medical marijuana patients with easier access to the drug. The new proposal would allow local governments to regulate nonprofit patient cooperatives, which could grow up to 99 plants.

Under the latest proposal, nonprofit patient cooperatives would be prohibited in counties with fewer than 200,000 residents – mostly rural areas – unless local jurisdictions enact ordinances allowing them. The cooperatives would be allowed in counties with a population of more than 200,000 unless local jurisdictions opt out through an ordinance.

The plan would create a voluntary registry for patients.

Source

Medical Marijuana for Dogs [video]

Interesting idea.

Vermont considers medical marijuana dispensaries

MONTPELIER — Here’s what Shayne Lynn envisions somewhere in Chittenden County: an office as non-descript as a doctor’s office or a pharmacy from which he would sell marijuana to those with qualifying medical conditions.

There’d be a waiting room. Clients would be seen by appointment only. There’d be security. He might also offer clients yoga, acupuncture and Reiki. He’d probably grow the marijuana somewhere else, at an indoor facility.

Lynn could become one of the first people to run such an operation in Vermont if proposed legislation the Senate is expected to consider this week passes.

Lynn, a 40-year-old professional photographer who lives in Burlington, said he believes in marijuana’s medicinal value for those who suffer from chronic pain and he thinks it’s wrong that such people have nowhere legal to buy the relief.

“People having to go out and buy it on a corner from someone — it’s not right,” Lynn said. “I see this as an opportunity to run a successful, local, nonprofit business which would provide medical respectability to the current and future patients on the registry. It would open a more honest, serious dialogue about the benefits of cannabis.”

Medical marijuana has been legal in Vermont since 2004, for those with qualifying illnesses — including cancer, AIDS and multiple sclerosis — who sign up for the state’s registry. The 2004 law allows patients to grow their own marijuana, but advocates say many find that a daunting task, leaving them with the prospect of making illegal deals for street dope.

The state’s medical marijuana registry specifies, “The Marijuana Registry is neither a source for marijuana nor can the Registry provide information to patients on how to obtain marijuana.”

The answer, advocates say, is to legalize a small number of medical marijuana dispensaries — nonprofit operations that would grow marijuana and sell it to those on the medical marijuana registry.

“They have a right to have this symptom-relief medication, yet we’ve given them no ability to get it in a legal manner in which the product is safe,” said Sen. Jeanette White, D-Windham, chairwoman of the Senate Government Operations Committee that passed the bill the Senate will consider this week.

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So high right now from this recipe – THC Pills

THC Pills – The really easy way.

You need:

  • Some high quality ground cheeba, I used approximately 2 grams of some diesel and put it through my grinder, then stuck it in the freezer for about 10 minutes and then went through it in a bowl with my fingers to really powderize it.
  • A pot or frying pan
  • Vegetable Oil
  • Pill capsules (this is found at a natural food market, in the bulk foods section I used OO size, which is big, but perfect for your weed pills,or you could always find some old vitamins and use those capsules)

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57 Percent of Floridians Support Legalizing Medical Marijuana

With 14 states and the District of Colombia allowing the legal medical use of marijuana, acceptance of the issue is steadily growing in America. A new poll shows that 57 percent of Floridians support legalization of medical marijuana as buzz grows that the issue could be placed on the ballot as soon as 2012.

Bob Norman reports that the poll was conducted by Fabrizio, McLaughlin & Associates, a Republican firm that worked with Rick Scott’s gubernatorial campaign. The pollsters asked point blank: “If there was a Constitutional Amendment on the statewide ballot to legalize the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes only when prescribed by a practicing physician and the election were held today, would you vote YES to legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes or NO to stop it?”

57 percent said they would vote YES (roughly 41 percent said they definitely would, and about 17 percent said they probably would). A recent ABC News poll found that across the nation 81 percent of voters support medical marijuana. It’s possible that this poll may even be conservative in estimating support.

Norman reports that such an amendment could come to the ballot in 2012, but 60 percent of voters would need to check yes for such a measure to pass.

While there wasn’t a big statistical difference based on gender and race, slightly more woman were supportive of the measure than men. 59 percent of white voters and 58 percent of Hispanics would vote yes, while only 55 percent of black voters would.

Voters in Miami would support the measure at 58 percent, but West Palm has the biggest munchies for medical marijuana with 73 percent. 79 percent of voters 18 to 24 would vote yes, while even a majority of voters 65 and up are supportive of the measure with 53 percent support.

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