Archive for the ‘Legalization’ Category

The Real Cause For An Exercise High: Cannabinoids

For decades, endorphins have hogged the credit for producing “runner’s high,” that fleeting sense of euphoria and calm that many people report experiencing after prolonged exercise. Who among us, after an especially satisfying workout, hasn’t thought, “ah, my endorphins are kicking in.” Endorphins are the world’s sole celebrity peptide.

Endorphins first gained notoriety in exercise back in the 1980s when researchers discovered increased blood levels of the substance after prolonged workouts. (Endorphins, for those who know the word but not the molecules’ actual function, are the body’s home-brewed opiates, with receptors and actions much like those of pain-relieving morphine.) Endorphins, however, are composed of relatively large molecules, “which are unable to pass the blood-brain barrier,” said Matthew Hill, a postdoctoral fellow at Rockefeller University in New York. Finding endorphins in the bloodstream after exercise could not, in other words, constitute proof that the substance was having an effect on the mind. So researchers started to look for other candidates to help explain runner’s high. Now an emerging field of neuroscience indicates that an altogether-different neurochemical system within the body and brain, the endocannabinoid system, may be more responsible for that feeling. Continue reading

Support for Marijuana Legalization Creeping Up

Public support for marijuana legalization continues its upward trend and has “never been higher,” according to a new poll from the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. The poll had support for marijuana legalization at 45%, up four points from the same poll a year earlier.

Half of respondents (50%) still opposed legalizing pot, but that number is down two points from last year and continues a two-decade long trend of declining opposition. In 1990, 81% opposed legalization; by 2000, that number had declined to 63%, and has continued to drop since then.

The upward trend line for legalization and the downward one opposing legalization are nearing the convergence point, and support for legalization will soon surpass opposition, if current trends continue.

Pro-legalization sentiment was strongest among 18-to-29-year-olds (54%), Democrats (53%), and people with some college education (50%). Among liberal Democrats, support rose to 66%.

Keeping marijuana illegal got the strongest support from Republicans (67%) and people over 65 (66%), and women (54%). Men were evenly divided on the issue.

The new Pew poll is in line with other polls in recent years showing a steady increase in support for marijuana legalization, but that we’re not quite there yet nationally. Still, we are getting tantalizingly close. You can review our archive of Chronicle articles about polls here.

- Article originally published at www.StopTheDrugWar.org

57 Percent of Floridians Support Legalizing Medical Marijuana

With 14 states and the District of Colombia allowing the legal medical use of marijuana, acceptance of the issue is steadily growing in America. A new poll shows that 57 percent of Floridians support legalization of medical marijuana as buzz grows that the issue could be placed on the ballot as soon as 2012.

Bob Norman reports that the poll was conducted by Fabrizio, McLaughlin & Associates, a Republican firm that worked with Rick Scott’s gubernatorial campaign. The pollsters asked point blank: “If there was a Constitutional Amendment on the statewide ballot to legalize the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes only when prescribed by a practicing physician and the election were held today, would you vote YES to legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes or NO to stop it?”

57 percent said they would vote YES (roughly 41 percent said they definitely would, and about 17 percent said they probably would). A recent ABC News poll found that across the nation 81 percent of voters support medical marijuana. It’s possible that this poll may even be conservative in estimating support.

Norman reports that such an amendment could come to the ballot in 2012, but 60 percent of voters would need to check yes for such a measure to pass.

While there wasn’t a big statistical difference based on gender and race, slightly more woman were supportive of the measure than men. 59 percent of white voters and 58 percent of Hispanics would vote yes, while only 55 percent of black voters would.

Voters in Miami would support the measure at 58 percent, but West Palm has the biggest munchies for medical marijuana with 73 percent. 79 percent of voters 18 to 24 would vote yes, while even a majority of voters 65 and up are supportive of the measure with 53 percent support.

Source

Anti-DEA Rallies Held Over Medical Marijuana Enforcement

A judge in Grand Rapids has postponed a hearing to determine if the state should cooperate with a federal subpoena seeking medical marijuana records. The delay was due to a last-minute request to intervene by a group called “the Michigan association of compassion clubs.” The Drug Enforcement Administration won’t talk about the Lansing-area probe, but will say they’re not cracking down on medical marijuana users.

More than 45,000 people in Michigan are registered to use marijuana legally. The postponement of that scheduled hearing almost foiled the plans of medical marijuana advocates. Members of “Americans for safe access” coordinated nationwide rallies in Las Vegas, Grand Rapids and Lansing to coincide with the hearing. The Grand Rapids rally was canceled, but the Las Vegas and Lansing ones went off without a hitch.

Medical marijuana advocates from the Lansing area made some noise. They’re raising their voices against what they call increasing federal involvement in states where medical marijuana is legal. Many have personal ties to the issue.

John Roberts, protestor: “I’ve been raided twice. First time they raided me they didn’t even take the plants, they took all the medicine we made for the patients.”

John Roberts is a medical marijuana user, caregiver and advocate. He says the feds need to stay out of the confidential records of medical marijuana users. Americans for safe access spokesperson Robin Schneider says the bigger issue at play here is state’s rights.

Robin Schneider, spkprsn Americans for safe access: “63 percent of Michiganders voted to allow for the use of medicinal marijuana and it’s time for the federal government to take a step back and allow us to engage of the use of medical marijuana peacefully and privately.”

The protestors called on State Attorney General Bill Schuette to stand up for their rights. Schuette could not be reached for comment. There were only a couple of dozen people who attended the rally in Lansing. Organizers attribute that to the cold weather. They expect more people to come to rallies they may hold in the summer months.

Marijuana Possession in California Equal to Parking Ticket

Starting this Saturday, January 1, the penalty for possession with as much as an ounce of marijuana in California will be same as if you had received a parking ticket.

Proponents of legalized marijuana say the relaxed state law is simply a sign that attitudes are changing. With possession being put on the same level as a parking ticket, it is going to be more difficult to make major crimes out of selling, distributing or growing marijuana, said Richard Lee, founder of Oaksterdam University, an Oakland school that specializes in marijuana issues.

Possession of an ounce of marijuana has been a misdemeanor crime punishable with a $100 fine. Under the new state law, the fine is the same but the charge is downgraded to an infraction.

State Sen. Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, introduced the bill making the change. He said the state could no longer afford to go after people who had committed a crime that carries the same punishment as parking tickets.

Carla Lowe, founder of Citizens against Legalized Marijuana, said the change was the worst new law passed by lawmakers in 2010.

“I believe this has knocked out one of the key pillars of prevention to help kids say we’re not doing drugs,” she said.

Law enforcement groups have also come out against the law, but it has gotten support from some law enforcement officials.

“I think it’s a good thing because it is calling the offense what it has always been, which is an infraction,” said San Mateo District Attorney Jim Fox.

According to the California attorney general, there were an estimated 78,500 arrests in 2008 and 74,000 in 2007 for felony and misdemeanor related charges associated to marijuana.

In November, California pushed a vote for legalizing the use of marijuana under Proposition 19 that would have legalized the plant. There were 53% voting against to 46% voting “yes” in defeat of the “Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act”.

War on Pot: A Raving Success!!! [pic]


This is sad because it’s true. Source

Powered by WordPress | Thanks to Wordpress Themes